Glasgow Museums

Over Week 6, I went to visit a couple of museums in Glasgow. The first I went to, was the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art.

The most useful part of the museum for my current work, I found was in the TASTE! exhibition. An exhibition where through the display of artwork and archive, presented a narrative which unpicked the history of the Gallery of Modern Art’s (GoMA) collecting, shining a light on both the artworks and the processes behind their journey from artist’s studio to museum collection.

On their website it states that “By hanging artwork and archive together, TASTE! suggests that object and idea are of equal importance and offers the exhibition as a space to enjoy, question and discuss the value of art.”

What I was first attracted to, was seeing the piece Oyster Stew Soup by Andy Warhol.

In his work, Warhol had the idea that artwork could be produced to specific consumer taste. He saw the artist potential in the modern industry and used the rapid technological progression within his work. His Oyster Stew soup is a work which finds joy in the everyday.

I drew quite a bit of inspiration from this piece and the philosophy behind it. To link consumerism and particularly the food advertising industry can be linked to the fetishisation of women. How it at times is almost ridiculous how women are presented to be “consumed”, alongside these products, or similarly. It brought into mind the value of brands and I’m considering how to incorporate this in my piece.

Another aspect of the museum that I really like, though may not necessarily be currently used in my work – is the curation.

The big lettering and titling of the pieces attracts your attention immediately, and in itself becomes a kind of advertising for the work. It was something I have never seen before but was a refreshing set up compared to the normal pristine presentations at museums

A second gallery I visited was the Kelvingrove Gallery of Art.

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There I was lucky enough to see a couple of Pre-Raphaelite portraits of women, a useful experience after doing some research on them to inform my portraits.

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